This week, after sitting and walking meditation, we read an article about natural awareness and how it relates to meditation:

What some meditative traditions call “natural awareness” is a state of being wherein our focus is on awareness itself rather than on the things we are aware of. It’s “a...

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Last week weread part of the chapter titled "The Heart of Practice" from Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh's classic book, Being Peace. He writes:

Without a cloud, there will be no water; without water, the trees cannot grow; and without trees, you cannot make paper. So the cloud is in [this sheet of...

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Special guest Sally Johnson joined us to share her experience with the work of teacher and author Reginald Ray. Here is an excerpt from Ray's book, The Awakening Body:

It is as if we are waking up, within our Soma [body], and we suddenly find ourselves in a new world. We are uncovering a comple...

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Before and after tea, we brought our attention to walking meditation or kinhin (Japanese). Walking meditation is often done between periods of sitting, and because of that is sometimes seen as a kind of stretch break. But that misses a vital point of why we meditate at all: to be present in our...

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After tea, we looked at a modern version of a technique called Chod, which was developed in the 11th century by Machig Labdron, one of Tibet's most well-known female mystics.

Lama Tsultrim Allione is a contemporary author and Buddhist teacher, and she created the Feeding Your Demons process (whi...

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Who Are You?

"Who are you without referring to any thought to tell you who you are?" After our sitting and walking meditation - and a tea break, naturally - we'll contemplated this question through a guided meditation by Adyashanti.

Adyashanti is an American-born spiritual teacher who has been teaching for...

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This week, after sitting and walking meditation, we'll use VOICE (Voice Of Innate Clarity Exercise) to work with the Tao Te Ching. This classic text, something like 2500 years old, has been a perennial source of wisdom and curiousity. The writer and lifelong fan Ursula Le Guin wrote:

It is the mos...

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We explored how our interpretations and the stories we tell ourselves affect our ability to deal with challenges. We'll do this using an excerpt from an article titled "The Benefits of Optimism are Real" and a technique from therapist and creative coach Eric Maisel that he describes as follows:

[...

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Our topic this week, after sitting and walking meditation, is how to work with change and loss. We used a podcast by Tara Brach, titled Skeleton Woman, to lead us into this unavoidable part of every human life. Brach says:

There's going to keep on being this stream - there's going to be pleasa...

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We read An article by the writer Austin Kleon after meditation. In it, he ponders how we can think of ourselves as a thing (noun) or as an action, a process (verb):

Religious people now think that they have to “believe” a set of incomprehensible doctrines before embarking on a religious way of...

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